PRESS STATEMENT: Sept 9 NATIONWIDE PROTEST, WORKSTRIKE, BOYCOTT, AND DEMONSTRATIONS 

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT

National Freedom Movement Against Mass Incarceration and Prison Slavery
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact Information:

For Media Requests:

Mothers and F.A.M.ilies, Inc
P.O. BOX 186,
New Market, AL 35761

Exec. Board Members Ms. Antonia Brooks, Ms. Dara Folden, Ms. LaTosha Scott

Phone: 256.203.4371

Freealabamamovement@gmail.com

For Movement updates and all other inquiries:

National Representative

Pas. Kenneth S. Glasgow

The Ordinary People’s Society
334.791.2433

September 9, 1971 ATTICA Rebellion 45th Anniversary

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT kicks off Sept. 9, 2016 National Non-Violent and Peaceful Prison Shutdown for Civil and Human Rights at Holman prison in Atmore, AL.

After launching its Movement in 2014 with the first coordinated work stoppages and shutdowns in Alabama prison history, FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT, building on its success with subsequent strikes, issued a call in 2015 with its document titled F.A.M.’s 6-Step Plan of Action 2015 (see our WordPress blog) for the first coordinated Nationwide Prison Work Strike in US History. This plan, along with its publication, “Let The Crops Rot In The Field” were then circulated throughout F.A.M.’s nascent network of supporters for its National Freedom Movement Against Mass Incarceration and Prison Slavery.

With assistance from other organizations and people, including Bro. Lorenzo “Kim’Boa” and Sis. JoNina Irvin of the Ida B. Wells Coalition against Police Brutality, Brianna Peril and David Boehnke of IWW/IWOC, Annabelle Parker, Mary Ratcliff of San Francisco Bay View, FREE MISSISSIPPI MOVEMENT and FREE MISSISSIPPI MOVEMENT UNITED, Queen T of SignofTheTimes/ FREE OHIO MOVEMENT, Anthony Robinson/The New Underground Railroad, Mississippi Southern Belles, Anarchist Black Cross and many others, F.A.M. began organizing, leading and directing this National call.

Today, September 9, 2016, at appx 12:01 am, FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT has kicked off the Sept. 9, Nationwide Prison Workstrikes, Boycotts and International Protests from Holman prison in Atmore, Alabama, in solidarity with confirmed strikes underway in Florida, South Carolina, and Texas.

F.A.M. has reiterated its call, first made January 1, 2014 with its first coordinated Workstrikes, for Non-Violence and Peaceful demonstrations both inside and outside of prisons as the solution to the exploitation and other forms of abuse that take place in Americas prisons, including forced prison slavery.

F.A.M. has often stated that the solution to mass incarceration and prison slavery must be lead by the men, women and children who are incarcerated and who are contributing to prison slavery and our own oppression by continuing to produce goods and provide services and purchase products that generate billions of dollars in revenue each year to support prison slavery. The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution continues to permit slavery to exist in this country “as Punishment of crime, whereof the person has been duly convicted,” and the institution and enterprise of slavery was legally transferred to the State government’s prison systems.

These Non-Violent and Peaceful protests  are designed to expose the nefarious economic motives of individuals, State and Federal government, and corporations like McDonald’s, Wendy’s, Starbucks, John Deer, the ALEC corporation, Victoria Secret, US military, Whole Foods, Wal Mart, Keefe, AT&T and Verizon call centers, and many others behind laws like mandatory minimums, three strikes laws, juvenile prosecution as adults, etc. that are used to incarcerate people under oppressive, inhumane conditions for extended periods of time, solely for the use of free prison labor for profit — yet in the name of crime and punishment.

F.A.M. has issued a “FREEDOM BILL“, which contains the demands that they are imposing upon the Alabama legislature to correct the problem of mass incarceration and prison slavery in Alabama.

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT
To assist FAM and their National Freedom Movement and to support the people on the inside who are making these sacrifices, please donate to famfamalabama@Gmail.com today.

Join Mothers and F.A.M.ilies Today

Mothers and Families
P.O Box 186
New Market, AL 35761
(256)203-4371
mothersandfamily3@gmail.com

Look for MAF on Facebook @ Maf Fam

Greeting from Mothers and F.A.M.lilies:

May this letter find you in the best of spirit and health in spite of your circumstance of being incarcerated in Alabama. We hope to lift your spirit by letting you know that we are in this fight with you for freedom, justice and civil and human rights until the end. Over the past 3 years, we have been fighting relentlessly alongside FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT and all others for justice in Alabama. Among our many activities have been:

1) Conducting protests at numerous prisons and in Montgomery to help bring awareness to the problems with ADOC, including the need for a mass release;

2) Promoting the Alabama FREEDOM BILL and demanding its passage by the Alabama Legislature;

3) Hosting rallies and workshops under the banner of INCARCERATED LIVES MATTER at Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama;

4) Meeting with local, state and federal official to address police brutality and other forms of corruption in ADOC;

5) Fighting for real wages for labor in ADOC so that working men and women can send money home to their families and children instead of enriching politicians in Montgomery;

6) Demanding changes to the Alabama parole board to provide for more paroles and more clearly defined criteria for mandatory parole;

7) Transparency and media access inside of ADOC; and more.

For the remainder of 2016, M.A.F. will be coordinating and conducting a Freedom Tour 2016 to canvas all of the prisons in the State of Alabama to garner support from more mothers and family members for our Movement to end Mass Incarceration in Alabama and throughout the Nation. If you are interested in becoming a part of this Movement or if you have any information that may be of use to us, please contact us.

Lastly, we want to remind everyone that the fight against Governor Bentley’s Alabama Prison Transformation Initiative Act and the construction of new prisons spending millions of dollars in Alabama is not over.   The bill will now head to the Senate floor for debate and a vote in the next regular session of the Alabama Legislature.   Be sure to contact your State Representatives to let them know that we oppose this plan. We want Education, Rehabilitation and Re- Entry Programs, not more economic exploitation and abuse.

Thank You,
Mothers and F.A.M.ilies

ALABAMA FREEDOM BILL

Free Alabama Movement Bill Cover: Education - rehabilitation - Re-entry Preparedness

*ALABAMA FREEDOM BILL

~ A BILL PRESENTED BY FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT TITLED,
ALABAMA’S EDUCATION, REHABILITATION, AND RE-ENTRY PREPAREDNESS BILL.*
[3-10-15]
PART 1 Section 1

Be it ENACTED A LAW that by January 1, 2018, Alabama’s Department of
Corrections (ADOC) will reduce its prison population down to its designed
capacity of app. 13,500; Alabama’s Department of Corrections currently has
over 29,000 people incarcerated in a system designed to hold less than the
14,000, making this State’s prison population occupancy rate of approx.
200% the *highest* in the nation. As recent as 2012, California’s prisons
were declared unconstitutional by U.S. federal court for exceeding 160% of
its occupancy rate.

Due to the ill effects of mass incarceration and prison slavery in Alabama,
including having the third highest incarcerate rate in the world of 650 per
100,000 residents. Alabama’s ADOC is now running a multi-billion dollar
free/cheap labor corporation by targeting black andb other poor citizens
for incarceration, while committing other civil and human rights abuses in
the living conditions, sentences imposed, release, and excessive fines,
costs, and other exploitive practices that are all beyond recourses of law.

For these obvious reasons, the Commissioner of ADOC is ordered by this law
to release no less than 400 persons per month (4800) per year, beginning
January 31, 2015, until the prison population is reduced to its current
design capacity

Section 2

Be it also Enacted that the Commissioner of the Alabama Department of
Corrections shall not allow the prison population of the ADOC to exceed
10,000 by the year 2020, where several Alabama prisons are over 40 years
old and constituted waste and serve no purpose towards education or
rehabilitation, and that if the Commissioner shall violate this decree,
anyone incarcerated in ADOC subject to such overcrowding shall have to
right to sue the Commissioner in any State court and receive as
compensation $1,000 from the ADOC budget for each day that this law is
violated:

Section 3

Be it also enacted that a moratorium shall issue upon the passage of this
Bill stating that no person convicted of a crime in the state of Alabama
shall be transferred to any out of state facility. In order to address the
ill effects of mass incarceration for private financial motives, no other
public or private prisons either within or without of the State of Alabama
shall be built to house any person convicted of any crime within the State
of Alabama. However, if an old prison currently existing within the State
of Alabama is closed, condemned or shutdown, a new prison may be built but
shall not exceed 110% of the original design capacity of the prison that
such new prison shall replace;

PART 2 Section 1

Be it also ENACTED that upon the passage of this Bill, the Commissioner of
the ADOC shall implement a program within the ADOC titled the Education,
Rehabilitation, and Re-Entry Preparedness program, and the Commissioner
shall designate all bed-space with the ADOC for this program. Such program
shall be made available to all people incarcerated within the ADOC,
irrespective of sentence, including sentences of Life Without Parole and
Death, which sentences shall be abolished in the state of Alabama.

Once enrolled into the E.R.Re-E.P. program, a new social/psychological
evaluation will be performed, along with a case review of the person’s
convicted offense. Thereafter, an Education/Rehabilitation curriculum will
be made based on the individual needs of the person being evaluated, and a
base parole date will be set within 30 days.

CAPITAL MURDER CASES:

Capital Murder cases will be classified into two (2) Levels:

LEVEL 1 CAPITAL MURDER CASES

Level 1: Level one capital murder cases will consist of those people
currently convicted of a capital offense and sentenced to Death or LWOP
with two or more victims, murder of a police officer, or a child. These
people, though eligible for parole, will require Special Review before
parole is granted. Review will be by the Governor, a classification
specialist and psychologist within the ADOC, and members of a Citizens
Committee selected by Free Alabama Movement Executive Committee.

This person, after serving 15 to 20 years, and upon completion of the
Education/Rehabilitation program, will then be eligible for review to be
placed in the Re-Entry Preparedness phase of the program. Upon successful
completion of the Re-Entry preparedness phase, this person would then be
eligible for parole upon Special Review.

LEVEL 2 CAPITAL MURDER CASES

Level 2 offenders consist of those people convicted of a capital offense
with one victim and who are currently sentenced to LWOP. These people will
not require special review and will become parole eligible upon successful
completion of the curriculum and after serving the full base minimum.

Those Level 2 offenders convicted under sections §13A-5-40 (16,17,18), Code
1975, after serving 10 to 12 years, and all the other Level 2 Capital
Murder offenders, after serving 10 to 15 years, and upon completion of the
EDUCATION/REHABILITATION/RE-ENTRY Curriculum, shall then be paroled back to
society.

*Any jury finding of future dangerousness automatically requires the
offender to seek SPECIAL REVIEW PAROLE.

MURDER CONVICTIONS:

All other persons convicted of murder under 13A-6-2 and sentenced to 15 to
99 to life, will received a base parole range of 7-10 years upon completion
of their initial review, and will be paroled upon completion of the
EDUCATION/REHABILITATION/RE-ENTRY PREPAREDNESS Program.

Any person convicted for murder and sentenced to LWOP pursuant to the
Habitual Felony Offender Act, will start with a base parole minimum of 10
years, with enhancements available for each valid prior felony conviction
(a prior felony used to enhance but later ruled invalid will be
retroactively deducted from the parole date).

PRIOR FELONY CONVICTIONS:

CAPITAL OFFENSES AND MURDER:

Any non-violent felony conviction (non-violent being defined as no serious
physical injury suffered by the victim), can increase a parole base by 1
year per prior conviction, with a maximum of 3 years.

Any violent prior felony conviction (where the victim suffered serious
physical injury) can increase a parole base by two years each, with a
maximum increase of 6 years. But in no event may a Level 2 offender also
convicted as a habitual offender be required to serve more than 21 years
upon successful completion of the program.

And no person convicted of murder and also as a habitual offender shall be
required to serve more than 16 years upon successful completion of the
curriculum.

Note*

Any one or more prior violent felony offenses found by a jury to contain
special circumstances (for example, a hate crime, a human rights
violations, shooting a victim 3 or more times, crime against a child), can
increase a parole base by a maximum of 5 years total. But in no event may a
Level 2 offender be required to serve more than 21 years upon successful
completion of the program, and in no event may a non-capital, non- habitual
offender, murder defendant serve more than 15 years before parole, and no
more than 20 years for a person convicted as a habitual offender upon
successful completion of the curriculum.

Note*

Completion of core curriculum for a prior felony or for completion of an
associate degree in college or equivalent can earn points deduction for
each prior felony used to enhance a sentence.

EXAMPLE OF OFFENSE CLASSES:

CLASS A Non-Capital FELONY:

7-10 Year base parole

CLASS B FELONY:

3-7 Year base parole

CLASS C FELONY:

1-3 Year base parole

For example, a person convicted of a ROBBERY would receive a parole base as
follows:

Robbery 1st degree 7-10

Robbery 2nd degree 3-7

Robbery 3rd degree 1-4

Assault 1st degree 6-10

Assault 2nd degree 3-16

Assault 3rd degree 1-3

Theft 1st degree 3-5

Theft 2nd degree 2-4

Theft 3rd degree 2 yrs max.

Manslaughter 1st 6-9

Manslaughter 2nd 3-6

Manslaughter 3rd 1-4

PART 2 SECTION 2

ALABAMA’S PRISON SETUP

LEVEL 6 PRISONS:

OPT-OUT CAMP.

Any person desiring to opt out of the E.R. & Re-E.P. will be assigned to an
opt-out facility and be processed pursuant to current ADOC regulations,
Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) and rules.

LEVEL 5 PRISONS:

STUDENT ORIENTATION:

LEVEL 5 PRISONS: These institutions will serve as 90 day to 180 day
orientation facilities, and will be where initial social/psychology
evaluations will be conducted and where parole bases will be set. These
facilities will also house the people who were formerly Capital and Death
sentenced, for 180 days to 1 year, respectively, for evaluation. Program
readjustment, program failures, and GED prep classes will be help at these
institutions.

LEVEL 4 PRISONS: These facilities will house students participating in GED,
SKILL AND TRADE DEVELOPMENT, AND SOCIAL- PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS (such as Anger
Management for violent offenders, AA-NA treatment for addicts, etc.)

LEVEL 3 FACILITIES: These facilities will offer INTRODUCTION TO LIFE
SKILLS, PEER LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT, MENTORING, AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
SKILLS. Also, these facilities will emphasize community volunteer programs
and have an emphasis on free world volunteers, religious and secular prison
ministries, and core curriculum and distance learning courses (the latter
may be used to qualify for point deductions from base parole set-ups).

LEVEL 2 FACILITIES: Residents assigned to these facilities will begin
Re-Entry Preparedness learning, including receiving practical computer
skills, learning the job market for their skill or trade, Home and Parole
Plan development, and continued learning and aftercare therapies.

LEVEL 1 FACILITIES: Residents at these facilities will receive practical
learning in Life Skills, including finding a job, creating a budget/savings
plan, opening a bank/checking/savings account, finding as apartment,
roommate, etc. for those without family assistance, and then Re-Enter
society.

PART 2 SECTION 3

EXEMPT PERSONS:

Exemptions:

Any person who has already served 21 Years or more, and who would not be
classified in LEVEL 1 status or need Special Review Parole, shall be
eligible for immediate placement in LEVEL 3 status.

Any person age 62 or above, who has already served 20 years or more and who
would not be classified as LEVEL 1 status or need Special Review Parole,
shall be eligible for immediate placement in LEVEL 2 status.

All persons in LEVEL 1 status or who require Special Review Parole shall be
eligible for Special Review Parole with one (1) year of passage of this
Bill into law.

PART 2 SECTION 4

DISQUALIFIED PERSONS

No person having committed and been convicted of two or more sex offenses
arising out of separate incidents, or an adult age 22 or above who commits
an offense against a child under 14, an elderly or disabled person shall be
eligible to advance beyond LEVEL 3 STATUS, and must seek Special Review
Parole.

PART 2 SECTION 5

SPECIAL REVIEW PAROLE:

ALL persons required to seek SPECIAL REVIEW PAROLE will be afforded an
opportunity to attend such hearing in-person, or by audio-video means, at
their discretion. In-person reviews shall be conducted semi-annually, and
audio-video hearings will be held quarterly. No person shall receive more
than one review per year, and upon completion of the program curriculum and
remaining in good standing, shall not be denied review for more than 3
years.

PART 2 SECTION 6

DUE PROCESS RIGHT

The provisions of this Bill create a substantive due process right pursuant
to the U.S. and Alabama Constitution, and any person subject to removal,
re-class, or other disciplinary action shall enjoy the right to challenge
such decision by Habeas Corpus in the proper jurisdiction as established by
Title 15, Code of Alabama 1975, and all provisions of the Alabama
Administrative Procedure Act applies to the ADOC in its entirety, Section §
41-22-3(9)g.1), to the contrary are hereby amended. All proceedings of a
disciplinary nature must be recorded by audio/video means.

PART 3 SECTION 1

Be it ENACTED that any person sentenced pursuant to the Habitual Felony
Offender Laws of this State, said applicable law must be charged in the
Indictment and proven in a bifurcated trial before the convicting jury,
(see U.S. SUPREME COURT decisions Alleyne v. United States, 570 U.S.–(June
17,2013) Apprendi v. New Jersey, 536 U.S. 545 (2002); Rangel-Reyes v.
United States, 547 U.S. 1200 Slip Opinion (2006); and; §13A-5-10.1(b),Code
of Alabama 1975), with said requirements being retroactive to the passage
of this law to any person sentenced as a habitual offender.

Due to the fact that laws like the HFOA were enacted for the sole purpose
of creating a massive pool of free/cheap labor, these laws are forever
repealed. A prior felony is just that, a “prior” felony where the debt has
already been paid to society. Therefore, this form of double punishment
will be limited to the 1 or 2 point enhancement provisions as laid out in
Part 2, Section 1 of this Bill.

PART 3 SECTION 2

YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS

Be it also ENACTED that any person who commits any crime between the ages
of 18 and before reaching 22, shall be prosecuted as a Youthful Offender.
As a Youthful Offender, such individual shall be ineligible to be charged,
tried or convicted as an adult and cannot be sentenced to more than 15
years in prison.

Such offender shall be ineligible of being charged with a capital offense
or sentenced to life, life without parole or death.

With the recent decisions issued by the United States Supreme Court,
including its decision in Miller v. Alabama, concerning juvenile
prosecutions for crime committed when they were as young as 14, it SHOULD
now be obvious to the criminal justice system that modern science debunks
all theories that these children can be effectively prosecuted as adults.
Modern science shows that these children simply lack mental development to
sufficiently appreciate the magnitude of their conduct, and that they are
simply too young to make such decisions without taking into account
external influences.

Therefore, upon passage of this law, no child under the age of 18 may be
prosecuted as an adult in the State of Alabama for violation of any law of
this State where they would be sentenced to a prison designed to house
adults.

Children under the age of 18 shall be prosecuted under the laws designated
for juveniles and may be held in a juvenile facility until their 22
birthday, at which time they will be released.

Children age 18 and above, but under the age of 22, may be prosecuted in
adult court, but only under the laws designated for Youthful Offenders.
This law will become retroactive upon passage of this Bill.

All provisions of his law will become retroactive upon passage of this Bill.

PART 3 SECTION 3

JOINT HOUSE RESOLUTION

Be it ENACTED that the provisions set out in House Joint Resolution 575,
sponsored by Robinson(J) and Black(M), SHALL be declared the law of this
State, amending Sections 13A-5-9 (16, 17, and 18), and that any person
indicted-pursuant to these provisions, said Indictment must charge that
such offense was gang- related and that a vehicle was used as an instrument
to commit the offense.

The amendment and all provisions herein shall be retroactive upon passage
of this Bill.

PART 3 SECTION 4

PROTECTION OF THE MENTALLY ILL:

It shall be the policy of the State of Alabama that no person suffering
from a mental illness shall be incarcerated in a prison designed for
persons convicted of a crime.

Mentally ill people, who now compose appx. 50% of all people in prison,
need professional treatment in a mental health facility, not punishment.
Within 24 months of the passage of this Bill, the ADOC and the Governor of
the State of Alabama, in conjunction with the Executive Committee of Free
Alabama Movement, shall draft standard procedures which must be unanimously
approved or submitted to an approved arbitrator pursuant to Federal
arbitrator laws, for identifying and releasing all mentally ill persons
from ADOC custody by January 1, 2018.

PART 4 SECTION 1

ABOLITING ALL LAWS THAT PERMIT SLAVERY AND INVOLUNTARY SURVITUDE IN THE
STATE OF ALABAMA:

Be it ENACTED that no citizen or laborer in the State of Alabama shall be
required to work any job in this State without compensation of less that
the prevailing minimum wage in Alabama, including those citizens
incarcerated in the ADOC, and that no restrictions on forming a labor union
shall apply to any person performing labor within or for the Alabama
Department of Corrections.

After over 400 years, it is time to remove Any exception, practices, or
provision of law that permits slavery or involuntary servitude from the
1901 Constitution of Alabama,including ART. 1, SEC. 32, which reads:

SECTION 2

Slavery prohibited; involuntary servitude.

That no form of slavery shall exist in this state; and there shall not be
any involuntary servitude, otherwise than for the punishment of crime, of
which the party shall have been duly convicted.

PART 4 SECTION 2

WELFARE COMMITTEE

Be it also ENACTED that the Commissioner of the ADOC shall create a Welfare
Committee at each prison, composed of the men and women incarcerated, and
elected by their peers, and that such Committee shall have authority and
ownership over all prison stores, canteens, and incentive package programs,
with the ability to negotiate with their own suppliers.

The Welfare Committee shall be permitted use the profits from these
businesses that they and their families are the exclusive customers of, for
Education, Rehabilitation and Re-Entry Preparedness Programs, recreational
supplies, and infrastructure needs like computers, irons, ice coolers,
coffee pots, televisions, and incentive packages for elderly, disabled, and
destitute prisoners.

FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ORIENTED REHABILITATION

PART 5 SECTION 1

CONJUGAL VISITS

Be it also Enacted that upon the passage of this Bill, there shall be
allowed within the Department of Corrections conjugal visits, which shall
be allowed no less than every 14 days for any person who has served 2 or
more consecutive years within the ADOC, and that every person, upon
marriage, shall be able to consummate such Marriage with a conjugal visits.

PART 5 SECTION 2

VISITATION

Be it also Enacted that the visitation policy in Alabama shall be that
every person confined in the ADOC shall enjoy a four hour visit every
weekend, and that there shall be no restrictions placed on who may visit,
and a minimum of 20 people shall be permitted on each person’s approved
visitation.

PART 6 SECTION 1

VOTING RIGHTS

Be it ENACTED INTO LAW that every citizen of the State of Alabama shall
have the right to vote, and this Right shall not be denied to any person on
account of a criminal conviction.

The right to vote is a fundamental civil and human right, and a criminal
conviction has no bearing on this right to vote. Civil offenses have their
own punishment, and conviction of a criminal offense shall not affect civil
rights.

There simply is no logical or reasonable reason why any citizen should lose
their civil right to vote because they have been convicted of a criminal
offense.

PART 7 SECTION 1

OPEN MEDIA ACCESS TO ALABAMA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

BE IT ENACTED as the Law of this State and the policy of the Alabama
Department of Corrections to allow unlimited access of the news media into
any and all State prisons at least 3 times per month upon a regularly
posted schedule, which shall be posted in each institution and made
available to the media.

Such access shall be permitted for at least 4 hours on the designated
media-day at any prison where permission from a member of the media is
requested. When media is on site no restrictions are to be placed on areas
where they may go.

Any media request to interview any person of interest to the media who is
incarcerated in an Alabama prison shall be conducted on this designated
media-day also. Such interview request shall be made at least one week in
advance and shall take place on the visitation yard.

No person incarcerated in ADOC shall be denied access to the media, and the
normal rules of visitation shall apply, except that the media shall not be
required to be on an incarcerated person’s visitation list. The media shall
not be restricted in any way from using audio, video or other recording
equipment on media-day.

In cases of emergency, such as rape, death, quarantine due to outbreak of
disease, or other matter of importance to the public, the media shall be
allowed access within 48 hours of the declared emergency situation.
Lockdowns, assault by officers and other issues shall not be grounds to
deny emergency or general media access.

For more questions, comments, or suggestions concerning this “FREEDOM
BILL”, please email us at:

freealabamamovement@gmail.com

or

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT
P.O. BOX 186
New Market, AL 35761

or

Freealabamamovement.com

Revised 3-10-15