Unconstitutional conditions at Staton Corr. Facility

Something has got to be done. This place is a war zone. We have been under quarantine for months for a TB outbreak and being no one can come or go it has been crazy.

The children that they have here are daily robbing and fighting, and because there is no segregation unit here the administration are being forced to use makeshift areas to house the trouble makers: the barber shop the law library class rooms etc.

Yesterday there was a fight and they put the two inmates back in the same dorm which led to more problems. Then there’s the heat: it’s so hot in these small overcrowded dorms with only two showers for 68 inmates. There are no screens in the windows, so not only do we have to deal with the heat but the flies and other insects as well.

The kitchen is the worst I’ve seen: no ventilation when we go in to eat. It’s so hot it makes you sick to try to eat and then there’s the flies and nats and dirty tables something has got to be done.

The Warden here should have been fired years ago he don’t care. You have officers here that are just as dangerous but I’m glad they are because if they wasn’t this place would have long ago exploded with uncontrollable violence.

I have been gone for almost 29 years and with what I see here it scares me to know that in society you all are having to deal with these mentalities of youths with guns. I saw my classification specialist today and I had already been told that she don’t do nothing. Well because I am a voice that’s not afraid to speak out I was told that I wouldn’t be put back in for my custody and transfer I Until October, yet others are told 90 days for me it’s 6 months.

I was suppose to go to court on August 3 on the actions of Childetsburg CC but due to the quarantine being extended that will be postponed. I was just informed that they have an inmate housed in the backwater shake down area somebody needs to do something!

DASTORY TELLER7

Note: Staton CF is at 2690 Marion Spillway Road, Elmore , AL 36025

Harriet Tubman on Freedom: An Offer You Couldn’t Refuse

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“If he was weak enough to give out, he’d be weak enough to betray us all, and all who had helped us; and do you think I’d let so many die just for one coward man.” – Harriet Tubman

Ausur Heru‎:

The Youth Summi

Take heed Freedom Fighters

Bennu Hannibal Ra-Sun:

She uses the masculine pronoun twice: “he’d” and “man.”

Bennu Hannibal Ra-Sun:

Three times…

Ausur Heru:

She didn’t stutter

Ausur Heru:

We must stay mindful that the majority of the cruelty, the training, the stripping of humanity, emasculating and the psychological terror was directed at the Black Man. He was and is severely damaged. The denial of this reality and the false bravado many use to cover it up, are 2 of the core reasons we can’t heal then re build ourselves.

Bennu Hannibal Ra-Sun:

That needs to be a segment on the show

Same Ol’ Song: Alabama Prisons Refuse to Change

“It’s Time for a New Beginning.” proclaims a campaign billboard for Alabama’s new governor-elect, Fob James. With Wallace gone and anyone new coming in, many Alabamans have responded to that slogan with a new sense of hope for their state.

Yet only 15 minutes from that billboard, a few miles from the 1-65 interstate in southern Alabama, stands a grim reminder that the old Alabama is institutionalized in too many concrete forms to be transformed with one campaign slogan.

Stretching for hundreds of acres in Escambia County is a vast plantation owned by the state. There are no stately mansions with white columns and verandas. There are, however, slave laborers. But the slave gangs, while mostly Black, are integrated. In the foggy dawn light they doubletime out to vegetable and cane fields, where they labor from “can-see to can’t-see” under the watchful eyes of shotgun-toting guards on horseback. If a slave should run, haying hounds will chase him down, and whether he returns dead or alive depends on the whim of his captor.

Some historians claim that Escambia County, Alabama, was the last county in the Confederacy to free its slaves. But it is now 1979, and “slave labor” administered by the state Department of Corrections is still the dominant form of labor relations in Escambia County, Alabama.

The name of the “slave quarters” was changed to G.K Fountain Correctional Center when the citizens of nearby Atmore demanded in 1974 that the name be changed to disassociate their town from the notorious Atmore prison. It was Atmore prison that Heywood Patterson in his autobiographical Scottsboro Boydescribed as “The Southernmost part of Hell.” Many say it still is, despite the name change.

Across the highway is the newer, but no more humane, maximum security Holman state prison. Deep in the rear corner of Holman prison is a chair. It was brought there from the old Kilby prison near Montgomery. With a new coat of yellow paint, it resembles that new plastic furniture with the modern square look. But it’s different – it kills people. Its last victim was a woman in 1965.

In the cells adjacent to that chair are 42 prisoners, all on death row, all scheduled to die by that faceless yellow executioner.

How one of Alabama’s death row inmates got there is a story which, in itself, raises serious questions about the competence of the Alabama judicial system to impose such

Johnny ‘Imani’ Harris

The facts in the case of Johnny ‘Imani’ Harris are unique in some respects. But in several others his case reveals fundamental flaws in the judicial and corrections systems of Alabama; flaws that any serious “new beginning” in Alabama must correct as its first order of business.

Johnny ‘Imani’ Harris is a 33-year-old Black man who is on Alabama’s death row after a chain of judicial atrocities. He was convicted in February 1975 of first degree murder for participating in a protest in which an Atmore prison guard died. The guard was killed during the violent suppression of the prisoners’ protest in Atmore’s segregation unit on January 18, 1974.

The state did not prove that the inmate, Johnny Harris, killed Luell Barrow, the guard who died. At a July 1975 pre-trial hearing. Assistant Attorney General George Van Tassel stated, “It is not our position that this defendant (Johnny Harris) was actually holding the knife or anything else. We don’t contend that this defendant stabbed the guard.”

It was merely for his alleged participation in protesting conditions later described by Federal Judge Frank M. Johnson as “barbaric, cruel and unusual” and “unconstitutional” that Johnny Harris was sentenced to death.

William Baxley, then Attorney General of Alabama, personally prosecuted Johnny Harris. Apparently aware that he had not proved Harris’ supposed connection to the. death of the guard, Baxley told thejury, “If you don’t want to believe that this defendant is guilty on circumstantial

Page 11

evidence, then put it out of your mind and look at the la on aiding and abetting. If you are convinced that any of these people (other prisoners) committed first-degree murder,” Baxley reasoned for the jury, “then Harris is guilty as well.”

The all-White, male Baldwin county jury from which Basley had systematically struck the few Blacks and women in the prospective jury pool, returned a verdict of first-degree murder.

Baxley’s dramatic prosecution of Harris may have been a bid for white “law ‘n’ order” votes in the anticipated governor’s race. But his reenactment of the death sentence brought a memory of horror to many Black Alabamans. To them the death sentence translates into legal lynching as in the case of the “Scottsboro Boys” and many others who were not saved. A definite pattern of racial discrimination in applying the death sentence was documented by Bill Bowers, a nationally recognized expert on capital punishment, at a recent appeal hearing for Johnny Harris. He testified that between 1927 and 1965, 82 percent of all executions in Alabama were of Black people. Bowers also testified that the death sentence is far more likely to be imposed if the victim is White and the defendant Black than if the situation is reversed. In fact there is no White on death row in Alabama for the murder of a Black victim.

Yet, Baxley appealed to Harris’ White jury that, “If we can apply it (the death sentence) here, it will be a start toward bringing it back.” A local NAACP official said, “After seeing Baxley send this young man to the chair I don’t see how Black people could ever vote for him again.”

Baxley dug up an 1862 law used only seven times in Alabama’s history to use against Johnny Harris. The civil war era law mandates an automatic death sentence for anyone convicted of first degree murder while serving a life sentence.

The law assumes that the life sentence itself was received fairly, with all the constitutional protections of due process and effective assistance of counsel. In many cases, particularly those involving Black and poor defendants, that may not be a safe assumption, as we shall see in the case of Johnny Harris.

Railroaded For Desegregation?

In 1970, Johnny Harris moved with his family into an all-White neighborhood in Birmingham. They were met with garbage on their doorsteps, paint and acid on their car, and Ku Klux Klan literature slipped under their doors. The Klan activity in the neighborhood was so strong that members of the Black community on the other side of Border Street, which divides the Black and White areas, were forced to form a protective association.

The Harris family refused to he intimidated. But according to an investigator for the Harris defense team, “This is where the police came in.”

Page 12

There were five Birmingham police officers living on the same street as the Harris family. Gary Thomas Rowe, a former FBI informant, testified to a Senate Committee in 1975 that the Birmingham police department worked closely with the Klan in resisting integration. The arrest of Johnny Harris could well have been a result of that close cooperation.

One of the senior arresting officers in the case was Lt. Cook, who, according to Rowe’s Senate testimony, made the arrangements with the Klan for the police to look the other way for 15 minutes while Freedom Riders were beaten severely on May 14, 1961, in the Birmingham Trailways Terminal.

On August 19, 1970, Johnny Harris was arrested on his way to work. According to Harris, his picture was taken, he was forced into a line-up (after his accuser may have been shown his photo), and then he was told that if he didn’t confess to a robbery and a rape charge more cases would be put on him.

The alleged rape victim was a young White teenager with relatives on the police force. Harris was eventually charged with four robberies – of $11, $67, $90, and $205 – and the supposed rape.

Harris gave one of his court-appointed lawyers a list of alibi witnesses who were with him in bars on the other side of town when the crimes were supposed to have occurred. But the witnesses, including bartenders who supported his alibi, were never subpoenaed to appear in court.

The attorney appointed to represent Harris on the rape charge, Louis School, according to jail records, never once visited Harris before his trial date. And he didn’t bother to investigate the alleged rape victim’s medical report.

According to their own testimony in a hearing last April that challenged the five life sentences, Harris’ appointed lawyers waived a preliminary hearing, made no motion I’m hail, failed to question the line-up procedure, neither interviewed the supposed rape victim nor looked at a medical report on the alleged rape, never questioned Harris’ illegal arrest or the warrantless search of his house, made no pretrial motions, and filed no challenge to a jury pool in ss hich Blacks were greatly underrepresented. At the recent hearing, one attorney, School, produced his file folder on the Harris case, with only seven pages of notes in it. In other words, his attorneys prepared no defense at all. And in 1970, Harris could have received the death sentence for a conviction on any of the five charges.

Testifying on his own behalf on those charges for the first time in eight years, Harris explained at the recent

representation, particularly in capital felony cases.

The decision of the lower court was upheld by the Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals and is now on appeal to the Alabama Supreme Court.

In Prison – A Struggle For Survival

The rest of Johnny Harris’ story is bound up with the desperate lives of thousands of Alabama’s prison inmates.

Faced with inhuman conditions, Alabama’s prisoners took that action which Frederick Douglas said separated the slave from a beast of burden – they rebelled.

In 1972, the prisoners, tired of ignored petitions to the public and the courts, staged a 100 percent effective workstoppage. While sugar cane rotted in the fields, the administration tried to defeat the strike with every tool at their disposal.

They threatened mass punishment with guns pointed at the prisoners sitting down in the yard. The prisoners held firm. They tried to divide the White prisoners from the Black – the prisoners remained unified. Finally, they beat, transferred and isolated over 300 prisoners, hoping to disperse the “ringleaders.”

The partially successful strike ended from a combination of repression and promised reforms. But the administration swore to destroy the prisoners’ organization, the Inmates for Action (I FA). All of the officers of the I FA were placed in Atmore’s segregation unit.

Johnny Harris, like many other prisoners, protested the conditions. In 1973 he was charged with attempted escape and placed in the segregation unit. Here he took the name Imani, which means Faith.

Even in the dark recesses of Atmore’s segregation unit, the IFA continued to conduct meetings by shouting down the hall from cell to cell. They conducted daily classes in reading and writing, political education, history, and legal and physical survival in a “lecture hail” of cells where, as Imani later write, their classmates were “familiar to them only by voice, not by sight.”

On January 18, 1974, guards entered the segregation unit with bloody uniforms, after beating an IFA member at Holman Prison across the street. According to prisoners, they said, “We ought to kill these revolutionary niggers, the way we killed Clanzy,” as they started to reach for bats and ax-handles.

Fearing that an attack was imminent, two prisoners who were out of their cells grabbed two guards hostage and freed the other prisoners from their cells within the segregation unit.

When the warden arrived he was informed by IFA Chairman George “Chagina” Dobbins that the prisoners’ sole demand was to see certain named members of the press, clergy, legislature, and prison administration in order to expose the beatings and conditions to the public.

The warden, Marion Harding, according to prisoner witnesses, told Chagina, “You’re a walking dead man.” Harding, a few minutes later, led a shooting attack by prison guards on the prisoners. The warden ordered one of the guards to shoot Chagina Dobbins. Dobbins was incapacitated by the ensuing shotgun blast of birdshot in the side.

Harold E. Martin, editor and publisher of The Advertiser Montgomeryand Alabama Journal, investigated the incident immediately. On February 15. 1974. he wrote in The Advertiser:

The Board of Corrections released a statement from a “fact-finding board” that Dobbins was killed by gunshot during the riot.

But State Toxicologist Nelson Gruhhs. who viewed Dobbins’ body at Mobile General Hospital, said that Dobbins died from nine stab sounds in his head caused by a heavy.sharp instrument wielded with enough force to penetrate the frontal bone in to places.

Who stabbed Dohbins and when is a mystery!

That “mystery” never resulted in any criminal indictments b the state of Alabama. even though Dobbins was apparently murdered after being shot and while in the custody of state officials.

One of the prisoners charged with the killing of the guard-hostage was Frank X. Moore. Moore was released from prison shortly after the incident, but was re-arrested at the gate on the murder charge and held on an impossible S250,000 bail in Escambia County Jail. While awaiting trial. Frank X. Moore, an IFA member, was “found” hanging in his cell. Sheriff Scotty Byrnes said it was “suicide.” But autopsy photos indicate a struggle.

Two months after the incident in Atmore, another IFA member at Holman Prison was beaten to death. Tommy “Yukeena” Dotson had smuggled out to a visitor a “death

Page 14

list” of IFA members allegedly found on the warden’s desk by a trustee. According to the Mobile Press Register, the warden denied the existence of such a list. But on March 12. 1974, Tommy “Yukeena” Dotson, said to be next on the list after Chagina Dobbins, was killed. He was removed, naked and handcuffed, from his cell, and, according to testimony, on the order of a captain, was beaten with ax-handles until his skull was caved in. Undisputed inmate witnesses said a second group of guards then came along, beat him some more, and threw his limp body down a flight of stairs.

,An attempt by the state to cover up this murder by prosecuting other IFA members for an alleged escape attempt supposedly planned with Dotson, fell on its face. The state’s witnesses so contradicted each other’s testimony that Escambia County Judge Douglas Webb directed a verdict of “Not Guilty” for the accused inmates. But when this reporter asked Attorney General Bill BaxIcy 1 the state would prosecute any guards for the murder of Dotson, he replied, “There was no criminal negligence: they were doing their job.”

The guards were also “doing their job” during the January 18 Atmore rebellion. At the murder trial of IFA member Gamba Mani (Oscar Johnson), Paul Echols, a White inmate from Georgia, testified:

When the guards came in shooting, some of us got in cells… They told us to come out with our hands behind our head or we would get shot … As we got to the lobby, they beat us while they made us strip … They took all of our a itches, rings, and money . . . and stomped on them. Then the made us crawl on our hands and knees putting our hands and heads on the next man’s ass while they heat us. I Iic made us hark that day. I guess to low grade us and iiov, us the were superior.

Another inmate, Claude Harris, testified,

The guards lined up on both sides of the wall and beat us as we crawled through their gauntlet. We crawled up to the visiting room. There were two tables there, one for signing a statement, and the other for medical treatment We had to make and sign a statement before even getting patched up.

Instead of either indictment or reprimand for this barbaric group torture. Warden Marion Harding was praised by the Attorney General. Baxley said at the Harris trial, “The State of Alabama can be proud to have men like Warden Harding in charge of its institutions.” With the “mystery” of Chagina Dobbins’ death still hanging over him, Marion Harding left the Alabama prison system to take an administrative job with the federally-funded Law Enforcement Protection Agency, and has since become Auburn, Alabama’s police chief.

Meanwhile, Johnny “Imani” Harris sits on death row fighting against an execution for a crime he didn’t commit in a place where he should never have been. With a dedicated team of lawyers, and growing national and international support, Imani and his hard working defense committee are hopeful that his execution can be stopped. But such a triumph for justice, however important, is only the beginning.

Imani wrote in a recent letter,

Before the U.S. government goes degrading other countries about the way they treat theirs and American prisoners, why don’t they look at the way American prisoners are being treated here in this country. Where they and we are still citizens. Yes, stop and look at the way these prisons are run and the way we are treated.

 

Press Release: Protest at St. Clair Against Police Brutality and Cover-up of Corruption

April 29, 2015

bloody floorPRESS RELEASE

By MOTHERS AND F.A.M.ilies

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

RE: PROTEST AT ST. CLAIR AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY AND COVER-UP OF CORRUPTION BY LT. RONALD CARTER AND THE RIOT TEAM

WHEN: Saturday, May 2, 2015, @ 11:30 am

WHERE: ST. Clair prison, Springville, AL

Contact: Ms. Antonia Brooks

Tel.: 256-985-1126

Email: freealabamamovement@gmail.com

On May 2, 2015, family members, friend, and loved ones of those who are incarcerated in ADOC are being asked to attend the protest at St. Clair prison against the police brutality by ADOC.

On April 17, 2017, Lt. Ronald Carter sparked more violence and police brutality at St. Clair prison when he beat Xavier Austin while in handcuffs. On this same night, another officer left his assigned security post and attempted to assault another man. These assaults, and the acts of self-defense in the face of this violence resulted in the RIOT TEAM being called into St. Clair on April 17 2015, and resulted in over 25 men being beaten by the RIOT TEAM.

Men lying handcuffed on the ground

“STOP POLICE BRUTALITY BY ADOC”

Police brutality at St Clair CF

“STOP POLICE BRUTALITY BY ADOC”

The ADOC is attempting to cover up this police brutality with a bogus investigation that has resulted in over 10 black men being charged with assault against Lt. Carter, but there have been no calls for any investigation into the police brutality claims, which were recorded and photographed. The ADOC is charging these men – all Black – in this matter based on “confidential sources”, but with no evidence of any kind, and in some instances even where ADOC’s own records show that these men are innocent.

RIOT TEAM BRUTALITYLt. Carter has been sued in multiple civil action and class action lawsuits for abuse as an officer while at Donaldson, including one beating that resulted in a man’s death.

11109450_1381111825552744_3192718925529773918_n 11150902_1378851579112102_6846024585230612933_nWhile at St. Clair, Lt. Carter has been named in more lawsuits for police brutality, several pending rigt now, including one filed by Bryan Stevenson of EQUAL JUSTICE INITIATIVE, which includes an incident where Lt. Carter choked a handcuffed man nearly to death and another man, Ventura Harris, was beaten by Lt. Carter’s subordinates while he stood and watched. Mr. Harris required over 15 staples to patch his skull back together.

11133677_1378851595778767_7823395652741745430_nAlso, several officers signed a petition that was circulated at St. Clair by Officer Brian Fife, where they were complaining about the abuse and bullying tactics by Lt. Carter towards officers. Lt. Carter has also been accused of sexual harassment by at least one female correctional officer.

We are asking all family members, friends, loved ones and supporters to attend this protest to “STOP POLICE BRUTALITY BY ADOC”, and to demand justice for those who have been wrongfully accused and/or beaten as a result of the actions of Lt. Carter. Stop this cover-up now and demand accountability against police brutality.

cc:

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT

FREE MISSISSIPPI MOVEMENT

FREE MISSISSIPPI MOVEMENT UNITED

MISSISSIPPI SOUTHERN BELLES

FREE DA TEAM

MOTHERS AND F.A.M.ilies

George Jackson University

Ida B. Wells Coalition

Black Autonomy Federation

IWW Alabama

IWOC

U.A.C.

San Francisco Bay View

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WSFA

African Reality System, By Jarred P

The youth must speak and ill be the voice. This is what ima do my best to put together when I can, A.R.S. African Reality system. The goal is to get across the advice that’s needed to succeed! Which teaches other young men and myself how important our roles are im the black family. And how we need to get out of prison, learn what it takes to stabilise ourselves when we get out of prison, learn the law and the constitution, learn how to think critically, and learn how to engage other young people in positive thinking and actions.

We will strive to educate the mindset of the youth to inspire proper communication so we can cut down on the beefs and stabbings to assure that we come home.

As well as learn about history, without the facts of history how can you be properly educated on the time we presently live in and that which is to come. Past\history is what created us, so its a must that we be educated on history, it’s vital to the protection of our future existence.

We must further our establishments in business and economics by learning thoroughly about both. With time comes a change,and with change brings a revolution,if the change doesnt benefit the whole. If its not beneficial its artificial. Each one teach one, am I my brother keeper? If prison doesnt rehabilitate then we must do it by ourselves! Free da team!

Mississippi Southern Belles

Hello Everyone I hope you having a great day. I will like introduce myself as a fair mind person & bring awareness to you all in hopes of empowering ourselves,our families & our communities!

All this week we will be meeting at 9 am at Smith Park in Jackson on amite St. We will be feeding God’s children and walking the streets with protesting signs shining the truth on how MDOC is physically, spiritually socially, and psychologically paralyzing our Husbands, Wives, Sons, Daughters, relatives according to their Lack of medical assistance, Lack of rehabilitation, Lack of re-entry preparedness programs, Lack of staff, Lack of feeding & a Host of Improper housing issues stemming from various Inhumane conditions.

@@@@@@

As peoples of Gods creation we are not perfect & Our fore fathers created this Human, Justice system for individuals that have fallen into errors & need to be rehabilitated for your future and your children future in our society, but somehow our Legislatures have abandoned, abused & allowed too many un-lawful decisions to subtract from the attributes of our Human reforms & we now have to witness no advancement of Our communities except more prison industries. It is too many errors in the body of these institutions not to have a effective & sufficient housing conditions under such circumstances, so It is our duty to bring to you all attention many facts that need addressing & corrected for the prison overcrowdness & free prison slavery etc. @@@@@@@@

Please join us in the struggle of overcoming the injustice, inhumane treatments of MDOC.”

Note of Cancellation of Visitation MDOC

Cancellation of Visitation MDOC

CMCF Lockdown, MS

CMCF Lockdown, MS

MDOC Lockdown Schedule 2015

MDOC Lockdown Schedule 2015

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1068195889863489&id=100000192657447&_rdr

Deep Down South, By JaJa Teule

Deep Down South in Alabama

I been down the dirt roads deep down south in Alabama I tended the cotton fields prayed in the shack and folded clothes til the sunsets deep down south in Alabama but when the night falls me and the brothers and sisters meet remembering our land before we were took from the belly of our mother singing songs of redemption and suddenly life is put into these tired hands and feet the drum is beat the fires lit and we fade into the ecstasy of oneness the connection the struggle the joy the bliss and being happy that I nor they are from this terrible land deep down south in Alabama.

Peace

FREE DA F.A.M. 3

Photo of Free Alabama Movement 3 and text Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world would do this, it would change the earth.

Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world would do this, it would change the earth.

PART 3

FREE THE F.A.M. 3: Non Violent and Peaceful Demonstrations threatened ADOC’s “Violent Culture of Control” Policies

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT
P.O. BOX 186
NEW MARKET, AL 35761

Phone: 256-985-1126

freealabamamovement@gmail.com
http://www.freealabamamovement.com

“FREEDOM OR DEATH. AINT NUTHIN ELSE. . . STOP PLAYING WITH THE CONCEPT.”  Dhati

Ever since solitary confinement came into existence, it has been used as a tool of repression.

While it is justified by corrections officials as necessary to protect prisoners and guards from violent super predators, all too often it is imposed on individuals, particularly prisoners of color, who threaten prison administrations in an altogether different way. Consistently, jailhouse lawyers and jailhouse doctors, who administer to the needs of their fellow prisoners behind bars, are placed in solitary confinement. They are joined by political prisoners from various civil rights and independence movements.”

And that’s exactly what Alabama is doing with their Solitary Confinement- using it to repress and torture anyone that speaks the words FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT. For exposing Alabama’s on going Human Rights violation  James Pleasant, Robert Earl Council and Melvin  Ray were targeted, singled out and labeled “threats to the security of the ADOC,” then placed in Solitary Confinement with indeterminate sentences.

At the time that these men made their decisions to address the ongoing Civil and Human Rights violations that were apparent in the ADOC, the prisons were historically overcrowded, there was a wave of violence brewing statewide throughout the prisons, living conditions were deplorable, food and healthcare we severely substandard and causing many illnesses and death, and the prison administrators, commissioners, and wardens were all refusing to respond and address the complaints.

Then, on January 1, 2014, under the banner of FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT, a Non-Violent and Peaceful Protest for Civil and Human Rights was launched at Holman  Prison, as over 1000 men went on shutdown [work stoppage].

Three days later, on January 4, 2014, 1300 more at St. Clair Prison joined in.  These demonstrations remained peaceful the entire time. ADOC officials  acknowledged to the AP that these demonstrations were peaceful:

“On Saturday, Alabama Department of Corrections spokesman Brian Corbett acknowledged to the Associated Press that since New Year’s Day, at least some prisoners have refused to work in kitchen and laundry areas and perform other jobs.”

“Corbett told the AP that the protests at the St. Clair and Holman Correctional facilities have been peaceful . . .”

[http://alreporter.com/in-case-you-missed-it-2/5571-alabama-prisoners-strike-continues.html]

Unfortunately for approximately 8 families with loved ones in ADOC, these peaceful ended too soon, because over the course of the next 14 months after the demonstrations ended, with no intervention or improvements from ADOC, approximately 8 men were killed. and hundreds more have been stabbed.

* Our beloved Lil Mook, Marquette Cummins, who came to prison at 17 lost his physical life on January 6, 2015, on the second day of the shutdown. His Spirit lives on and serves as a reminder to us all that we must bring these prisons to an end because they ccontinue to take life, yet give nothing of value in return.

ST CLAIR DEATHSAlso, at the same time that these peaceful demonstrations were concluding, the US DOJ issued a report detail the two-decades long horror story that emanated from Julia Tutwiler Women’s Prison in Wetumpka, AL.

According to the report, which was completed after a long investigation, the women confined at Tutwiler had been raped, impregnated, sexually assaulted, abused and exploited for sex for over two decades. Children were born. Children were aborted. Women were beaten and raped, and it was estimated that at least 1/3 of the ENTIRE corrections staff had been involved in the abuses. In that time, less than 10 officers has been prosecuted, and the most time handed out was 6 months, with one officer getting 5 days.

Now, approximately 14 months later, and exclusively for organizing a “non-violent and peaceful protest”, these three men, Robert Earl Council, James Pleasant, and Melvin Ray, have all been labelled a “security threat”. In addition, F.A.M. and the family members and supporters, including those who had lost a loved one to the violence and who were supporting F.A.M.’s call for an end to the violence, were also labelled as a security threat.

Under ADOC rules, violence such as riots, assaults, destroying property, etc., all fall under security threats. In fact, under ADOC rules, a person who commits a murder while in ADOC custody must serve 30 [months] in solitary confinement. Yet, the people who are trying to stop this avoidable and senseless loss of life are subjected to indefinitely periods of solitary confinement. In other words, if any member of the F.A.M. 3 were guilty of committing a murder, they could look to be released from segregation in a definite period of time of 30 months, but for engaging in peaceful protests against the conditions that lead to violence and murder, these men became “security threats.”

Not a single ADOC rules prohibits “Non-Violent and Peaceful” demonstrations. In fact, the right to peacefully assemble is guaranteed and protected by the 1st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

In response to the protests, in light of the conditions that were exposed by F.A.M. on social media like YouTube and Facebook, Gov. Bentley and Sen. Cam Ward created a Prison Reform Task Force and have since verified EVERY issue that F.A.M. complained of.

Additionally, EJI followed the demonstrations by filing a lawsuit about the violence at St. Clair, were hundreds of people have been assaulted, including one person by the warden, Carter Davenport, who has since been reassigned to another prison (he was a Captain at Tutwiler during the rapes, etc.). The SPLC has filed a lawsuit on the healthcare against ADOC after the demonstrations.

When Gov. Bentley, Sen. Cam Ward, Chief Justice Roy Moore, Attn General Luther Strange and other state officials acknowledged the problems within ADOC that were exposed by F.A.M., THEY were not labelled security threats. When al.com confirmed that Warden Davenport was the root of the violence at St. Clair they were not labelled a security threat. When the US DOJ reported on the abuses at Tutwiler, they were not labelled a security threat.

But when the people who live in the violence, the very people who are forced to live in the inhumane and uncivil conditions complain about the violence with -non-violent and peaceful protests”, they are labelled a threat to security, even where the violence levels, understaffing, and decrepit conditions show that there is NO SECURITY TO THREATEN, and certainly none to threaten with “Non-Violent and Peaceful Protests!!!

Join F.A.M. as we demand answers from ADOC and other Alabama officials about why these men are being punished for complaining about these ongoing civil and human rights violations.

#INCARCERATEDBLACKLIVESMATTERTOO

#freedafam3

WARRIOR CALL: Freedom or Death, Ain’t Nothing Else

By Dhati Khalid
freealabamamovement@gmail.com
http://www.freealabamamovement.com
256-384-4FAM

In order for this MA$$ [Econonic] eXXXploitation of FREE and/or CHEAP prison labor to stp those of us who are about FREEDOM, JUSTICE and EQUALITY have to shut these $lave indu$trie$ dwn utilizing THE BEST/MOST EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS to eradicated the problem.

I have come to understand that not everyone, maybe not even most will stand up for FREEDOM, JUSTICE and EQUALITY for many *illigitimate reasons, but, after being in many battles for most of my life and after studying some of the world’s greatest generals, EYE AM not of the counterfeit concept that greater numbers mean victory. The victorious group has been the minority.! They were the most Dedicated, Determined and Disciplined, Organized and Unified of the two sides.

Bottom-line, we – The Minority – have to be unyielding, unwaivering, steadfast and out right relentless for what “we proclaim” we want more than anything and right nw EYE dnt see that frm us yet. Whn you meet your enemy for war, you never bkdwn, unless it iz in a stratagem.! War is deception.

May 30th: National/International Protest Day to “S-To-P” the “school-to-prison” pipeline

11225786_10152915830247198_1260784382_nMay 30th NATIONAL McDonald’s PROTESTS
McDonald’s / St. Vincent Hospital

Where: 2733 8th Avenue, South
Birmingham, Alabama 35203

Time: 12 noon

National Freedom Movement’s “S-To-P” Campaign Against McDonald’s to “S-To-P” the “school-to-prison” pipeline.

11126929_1561498580768511_8768531314490261835_n

FREE ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI MOVEMENT UNITED . . . we got our Youth covered.

F.A.M.’s Step 3 McDonald’s INITIATIVE: “S-To-P” the “school-to-prison” pipeline.

1) S-To-P doing business with companies that invest in, and profit from laws and school policies that target children for the “school-to-prison”.

FOTA7C32) S-To-P doing business with companies that build factories in prisons but not in our communities.

3) S-To-P doing business with companies that pay slave wages to people in prison, but won’t employee people in high-unemployment communities.

11287432_10206815466568514_893364780_o4) S-To-P doing business with companies that profit off of mass incarceration FOR prison slavery.

https://freealabamamovement.wordpress.com/2015/03/24/f-a-m-s-step-3-mcdonalds-initiative-s-to-p-the-school-to-prison-pipeline/

THE BLUEPRINT TO STEP 4 ORGANIZING AT THE PRISONS

“THE BLUEPRINT TO STEP 4 ORGANIZING AT THE PRISONS”

We are getting close F.A.M.ily. Thanks to Bob Witanek and his friends in NJ with Decarcerate The Garden State, we have so insight into developing a blueprint for our Step 4 INITIATIVE.

http://decarceratenj.blogspot.in/2015/03/in-response-to-south-woods-authorities.html

http://decarceratenj.blogspot.in/2015/03/decarcerate-garden-state-to-challenge.html

http://decarceratenj.blogspot.in/2015/03/south-woods-prison-outreach-to-visitors.html

Job Opening F.A.M. Step 3. Director, “S-To-P” the “school-to-prison” pipeline

Are you qualified for the job?

WANTED: Director – Step 3 McDonald’s INITIATIVE: “S-To-P” the “school-to-prison” pipeline (Alabama)

Phone: 256-384-4FAM
(Correction made)

freealabamamovement@ gmail.com

“We have to confront the school to prison pipeline by confronting the economic incentive for the pipeline. Our children are being targeted for the modern slave trade know as mass incarceration FOR prison slavery. We have to organize at the companies like McDonald’s — one company at at time — who are investing in these practices.”

https://freealabamamovement.wordpress.com/2015/03/24/f-a-m-s-step-3-mcdonalds-initiative-s-to-p-the-school-to-prison-pipeline/

F.A.M.’s STEP-3: McDonald’s INITIATIVE: S-To-P The “school-to-prison” pipeline

11287432_10206815466568514_893364780_o“In order to stop the school-to-prison pipeline, we have to bring our Youth into the Movement and attack the economic facilitators who finance the pipeline.”

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT

freealabamamovement@gmail.com
Freealabamamovement.wordpress.com
Tel.: 256 384 4FAM

In the 1600’s and 1700’s when slavery took off in America, the British Crown and other foreignIllustration: We have to break this chain companies financed the slave transport systems that helped to ship millions of men, women and children of African descent around the world for forced slave labor. Also victimized by these slave traders were the Native inhabitants of North and South America.

In 2015, slavery continues on around the World and particularly in America in the front of mass incarceration FOR prison slavery. The companies that now invest in the transport of men, women and children predominately of African descent (and Native inhabitants and Mexicans) are familiar names like McDonald’s, Wendy’s, Dell Computers, CCA, GEO Group, U.S military, Victoria’s Secret, AT&T, WalMart and so many more.

But instead of shipping human cargo from the continent of Africa, the U.S. slave market now ships directly from predominately black inner-cities communities and other poor communities inhabited by Africa/Black/Mexican/Native/Poor people.

Today the lifeline of this mature capitalist market has come to be known as the “school-to-prison” pipeline, where children in poor black communities are under attack for prison by market forces that create poverty, unemployment, political assault from so-called criminal laws, under-investment in schools, AND multi-generational absences of millions of black men, women and children who are incarcerated in US prisons.

In response to this, FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT has developed a 6-Step Plan of ACTION 2015, and Step 3 of this plan involves strategizing around the economics factors of the pipeline and targeting companies one at a time, starting with McDonald’s, who are involved in this modern slave trade.

FOLLOW THE MONEY, AND WATCH THE CLOWN

We're not loving it (FAM, FCM, FMM): Modern Day Slave Labor: McDonaldsJust like all other issues in American society, in other to overstand the Problem and to understand the Solution, all you have to do is follow the money.

As we said, McDonald’s is just ONE of the many thousands of companies that profit off of prison slavery. In our McDonald’s research group, “FAM-FMM UNITED Against McDonald’s”, we show where McDonald’s uses prison slave labor to produce products like their uniforms, spoons, frozen foods, process beef for patties, and also to process bread, milk and chicken products.

McDonald’s and other companies benefit from prison labor because they reduce labor cost by employing people in prison for either free or penny slave wages. No minimum wages, no overtime, no earned vacation or sick time, no 401k contribution or maternity leave. No healthcare insurance, NOTHING!!! And, anyone refusing to work is met with paperwork that can affect release, result in loss of visits with families and children, threats, and even violence by correctional guards.

Ronald McDonald and his friends in corporate America invest in and profit from the S-To-P pipeline as follows:

1) Companies like McDonald’s invest in or build prison factories to produce their goods like uniforms, patties, spoons, frozen food, etc. They build factories in prison to produce these products, but they won’t build these same factories in our communities to provide jobs.

2) Then, these companies build most of their storefronts outside of our communities and deny jobs to people from our communities, including those of us with felony convictions who need a job to stay out of prison. This is how they manufacture unemployment, which inevitably leads to crime.

3) Finally, after denying us a job in society, Ronald McDonald and his corporate friends who also invest in prison slave labor, wait for the men and women to get caught up in mass incarceration and the school-to-prison pipeline. Once they have us in prison, they force us to work for them in their prison factories for free.

A SOLUTION TO ENDING THE SCHOOL-TO-PRISON PIPELINE: Ending Mass Incarceration FOR Prison Slavery

School-to-Prison-Pipeline 'Stopp'We can SOLVE the school-to-prison pipeline by dismantling the economic incentive for the pipeline. None of these problems would exist if they weren’t making money off of them. So in order to uproot the problem, we have to attack it at the economic core. We have to organize at the companies like McDonald’s — one company at a time — who are investing in these practices to expose these slave traders for what they really are and force them to stop investing in prison slavery.

Our strategic and tactical approach to this Step 3 INITIATIVE: S-To-P the school-to-prison pipeline is laid out in our article titled, “LET THE CROPS ROT IN THE FIELD,” for anyone who wants to participate with a clear economic approach in mind to dismantling the pipeline:

“We will start off our McDonald’s protest by locating and reaching out to the people in the prisons where McDonald’s products are produced. At the same time, we will begin letter-writing campaigns to their investors and shareholders, while also leaving leaflets/pamphlets on the cars of their customers at McDonald’s restaurants nationwide, and organize protests at their storefronts, in a mall or headquarters, or wherever we can, and call for boycotts of their stores to force then to stop using products that are manufactured by forced prison slave labor.

But we focus all of our attention on one corporation at a time, instead of using a scattered approach of multiple orgs spread out thinly over several corporate fronts.”

In the end, McDonald’s and their corporate partners have a choice to make:

1) S-To-P investing in the “school-to-prison” pipeline by building factories in prison to fuel mass incarceration The School-to-Prison-Pipeline 'Stopp'FOR prison slavery, and start building those same factories in the neighborhoods where unemployment is high where their prison slaves comes from, or

2) Feel the wrath of the People until we close these storefronts down that are exploiting us by taking the money that we spend with your company to build prison factories, while at the same denying us employment.

THE MEN (AND WOMEN) ON THE INSIDE HAVE TO STAND UP AGAINST THESE PRACTICES AND STAND UP TO PROTECT OUR CHILDREN

On the inside, we have to organize work strikes to stop producing products for these companies like McDonald’s who have economically conspired against us to fuel mass incarceration FOR prison slavery. We have to strike to shutdown these prison factories that were built for us in prison, but not in our communities. Work strikes remove this revenue from the prison budgets and puts additional economic pressure on their budgets to release us.

If McDonald’s and other companies want to hire us for jobs, then hire us in our communities where unemployment is high, not in your prison slave factors, where incarceration is at an all-time high of 2.5 million Americans.

A CALL FOR YOUTH ORGANIZERS, ACTIVISTS AND OTHERS WHO ARE BEING TARGETED TO HELP “S-To-P” THE SCHOOL-TO-PRISON PIPELINE

Behind bars pencilsIn our Step 3 McDonald’s INITIATIVE, we also want to bring our Youth into the Movement, educate them about the economics behind mass incarceration, and give them a Voice and direct action against the corporations that target them or have kidnapped their family member or loved one.

We have an army of Children being targeted in their schools for the school-to-prison pipeline AND we have an army of Children who continue to be impacted by mass incarceration FOR prison slavery with a parent or other family member or loved one in prison.

We must work collectively to unmask this clown and expose him to our children as an investor who is betting on our children having a future serving them on the school-to-prison pipeline.

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENTAlabama 3

FREE MISSISSIPPI MOVEMENT

MISSISSIPPI SOUTHERN BELLES

MOTHERS AND F.A.M.ilies

FREE CALIFORNIA MOVEMENT

Read our PLAN OF ACTION 2015, as outlined in our article, “LET THE CROPS ROT IN THE FIELD,” and start organizing a Charter today using our 6-Step Plan of ACTION 2015

Step 1. Draft out a FREEDOM BILL for your State, identifying the laws and changes that need to be made to address mass incarceration and prison slavery in your State.

Step 2. Find a prison in your State and make it the Headquarters for your FREE – (YOUR STATE’S NAME) MOVEMENT.

Step 3. Identify a list of McDonald’s storefronts in your city/county/state that you will organize awareness rallies/protests at.

Step 4. Start organizing at the prisons with other family members on visitation days.

Step 5. Announce a National Shutdown Day for ALL incarcerated laborers!!!

Step 6. SHUTDOWN!!!!

 

Photo of Free Alabama Movement 3 and text Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world would do this, it would change the earth.

Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed. If people all over the world would do this, it would change the earth.

You Only Get Out of a Movement What You Put Into It – Free Alabama Movement

ATTN:

Are there any family members, friend, loved ones, supporters, etc. who are interested in helping to organize a workshop and other activities to promote our “FREEDOM BILL” and the 6-Step Plan of ACTION 2015?

We are looking for people to get involved and to participate in the process to help get deserving people free from prison or to ensure that the appropriate programs and resources are available to help those in need of education, rehabilitation and re-entry preparedness while they are serving time.

More people have to get involved if we are going to see ANY change !!

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT

McDonald’s Is Feeling The Heat

We haven’t even got started implementing our 6-Step Plan of ACTION 2015 at McDonald’s, but other orgs are already demonstrating. F.A.M. needs to take advantage of this opportunity to organize with these allies:

“The protest was organized by Wisconsin Jobs Now — a non-profit organization that has worked with fast food and retail workers to get higher pay. The organization says complaints have been filed against several McDonald’s in Wisconsin. But officials would not say how many or where.”

http://fox6now.com/2015/03/17/protests-held-outside-wauwatosa-mcdonalds-not-for-wages-but-health-and-safety/

Quit Fighting Mass Incarceration and Prison Slavery ASS_BACKWARDS

By Spokesperson Ray
freealabamamovement@gmail.com
www.freealabamamovement.com

It will take protests from the INSIDE directly attached to the prison jobs where the labor is being performed to effectively fight mass incarceration AND prison slavery. The PURPOSE of mass incarceration is FOR prison slavery. There are hundreds of Billions of dollars being made off of prison labor. If you aren’t affecting these corporations, then you aren’t going to be able to EMPOWER the People to be able to make change.

Otherwise, who is going to listen or care??

Politicians are listening to the businessmen and women that they are working for. The corporations are donating to the pols, who then cut them in on the prison contracts, which gives them access to the prison labor, where they make ther money. When the money stops, the investment starts losing money. Only then will anyone pick up the phone . . .

Join the 6-Step Plan of ACTION for 2015, which was devised from the INSIDE with the economics (not the politics) of prisons in mind

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT. . . A MOVEMENT THAT WILL. NOT. STOP !!!!

Senate Bill 67: Reform or Racket to Exploit Crime and More Poor Families

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT
By Melvin Ray
freealabamamovement@gmail.com
http://www.freealabamamovement.com

After over a year of research, meetings, studies and other expenditures of tax-payer funds, the Council of State Government (CSG) and the Alabama Prison Reform Task Force (PRTF) have given the Alabama people Senate Bill 67 as the solution to the issues in Alabama prisons and the state’s criminal justice system.

The PRTF and CSG got off to a controversial start when it was revealed that of the 25-member task force, not a single African American male would be part of the decision making process, deliberations, or considerations of the group. Being a black man, the hypocrisy of this struck me from the beginning: Black men, who make up approximately 13% of the total state population, are approximately 60% of the total prison population.

Note** The U.S. GOVERNMENT Bureau of Statistics, shows that 70%% of all crimes ccommitted in the U.S. are ccommitted by white people.

So, this means that the families and communities most affected by the prison and judicial system are black. Yet, in a way that only a state like Alabama can explain, not a single black man was invited to discuss what solutions would be best to fix a problem that has been created by people who look just like the CSG committee and the PRTF — predominately white men.

Alabama prisons currently hold over 30,000 people in space designed to hold less than 14,000 people. Of this 30,000, approximately 80% of ALL people who enter into ADOC are functionally illiterate — or worse. Most of these people are young, poor, unskilled, and addicted to some type of drug. The problems made manifest in such a setting are predictable and expected.

Overcrowding serves to breed problems:

MALNUTRITION

First, the budget is fixed to serve just over 13,000 , while the prisons hold 30,000-plus. With low budgets, the cheap, undercooked food being served lacks nutrition, inadequate portions, and consists mainly of processed foods. In a word, the people in Alabama prisons are malnourished.

UNSANITARY WATER SUPPLY

The water system in Alabama’s prisons was designed to filter and serve less than 14,000  people. So imagine what happens when this system is overburdened with 30,000-plus people. First, the water is not properly filtered before it enters back into the prisons. This contaminated drinking water is the major contributor to most ailments in Alabama prisons.

Food isn’t properly cleaned. Bodies aren’t cleaned. Clothes aren’t properly cleaned. Thus, diseases, infections, cancers, and deaths ensue.

Then, you have people literally stacked on top of each other. This breeds other problems: frustration, depression, and mental illnesses.

Untreated mental, emotional, psychological and addiction issues lead invariably to violent settings. St. Clair prison is Exhibit A in this crisis.

Death and disease are so widespread due to inadequate resources for meaningful healthcare.

Quarantines for outbreaks of TB, scabies, and Staph (and now food-food-poisoning) are now common protocols.

Sometimes, staff, family members who visit, lawyers, and people in the prisons aren’t even informed of outbreaks due to delays in detection.

Then, you have the actual living conditions. Filth is everywhere. The water supply is contaminated. Showers are almost always cold due to overuse because the water system wasn’t designed for so many people. Cleanliness is a constant issue. Mold, mildew, rats, roaches, spiders, snakes, and bugs are in every crack and crevice. Repairs to all areas of the infrastructure are needed, with some prisons being over 40 years old.

Health, food, and fire inspectors are rarely seen. When they are present, they are not doing their jobs of accurately reporting on the wholesale violations that are so prevalent.

However, when one examines SB 67, one doesn’t see a single one of these issues being addressed.
The human costs and abuse associated with reform needs are being totally ignored because no one cares about the inhumane, uncivilized treatment of men and women in prison. And certainly not those in Alabama’s prisons, who are majority black and all poor.

In fact, the PRTF is calling for 2,000 more beds to be added to existing facilities. Senator Cam Ward has stated that the goal is to reduce overcrowding to 140%, which courts have said is acceptable. But the question to ask is: why can a state Senator openly say that his goal is to violate a health/fire code for maximum occupancy, and feel no consequences whatsoever? Where is the Fire Marshall to remind Senator Ward that fire codes are to be strictly complied with, including occupancy rates? A Fire Marshall will close down a night club, a basketball arena, or a restaurant for being over-capacity, but here we see that the law doesn’t apply to the prisons.

Instead, it is the *goal* of Alabama officials to have a illegal, overcrowded prison system and the Fire Marshall says nothing.

SB 67 doesn’t address any of these issues. Sen. Cam Ward and his cabal have sat down as if they were doctors, to solve a problem without asking their patients a single question about what is wrong or what could be done to fix the problems. To my knowledge, the PRTF did not enter into a single prison and ask the occupants about our issues, where the problems areas are, or what solutions we see as being needed. Nor did they enter into a single black community, which is where mass incarceration has had it worst effects, to see how these issues should be addressed. White men in Alabama are not accustomed to consulting Black men on problems, even those problems created by white men that disproportionately affect black men, like mass incarceration.

Some Alabama prisons house in excess of 1,000 people – most of whom are illiterate – and don’t even provide a GED program, let alone sustainable job skills programs. There are currently no gang-intervention programs, no community volunteer programs at the community custody facilities, no Life Skills programs – and SB 67 is not calling for any of them. These are programs that most Black community leaders, religious leaders, mothers, and fathers will tell you that our communities need from the ADOC while they are holding these men for decades at a time. Yet, Senator Ward doesn’t see a need for Black voices on the PRTF or the all-white CSG.

In Alabama, where uneducated people fill the system, education is neither encouraged nor mandated. A person with a 10-year Sentence with no GED, skill or trade, and who has a known drug or alcohol addiction, does not have to attend school, learn a skill or trade, participate in any program — and can still earn Incentive Good Time. How can a person earn “good time” if they are not actively addressing their shortcomings and issues that lead them to prison in the first place?

As for the Alabama Parole Board, one has to wonder just how much longer the charade can go on. In 2015, they still don’t allow a person to attend their own hearing. We can watch Satellite television, use Tango and Skype, but the Parole Board still can’t find a way to hear from the person (not a file) going up for parole.

The hearing itself is a show of power and disrespect. The parolee gets all of two speakers, who each get  5 minutes to speak. A person who has made 20 years of change has to have someone else try to communicate that change in 2 five-minute exchanges. Then, the victim of the crime gets to speak.

They get unlimited speakers, for an unlimited time. If a victim can’t attend, no problem. Hired speakers (called Victim’s Advocates), on tax-payer dime, can speak. Again, they are not restricted by any time constraints, whatsoever.

The facts of the crime are already known. A parole hearing is supposed to be about what changes the person has made to show that they have learned from their mistake, improved themselves, and are now prepared for another chance at society.

The parole board sits on the file for decades, and never even sets out a curriculum for what they expect to see from a person vying for parole. It is all a tax-payer funded dog-and-pony show scam.

SB 67 is nothing more than an expansion of the scheme.

SB 67 is joining the nationwide, elaborate money grab operation (that once again is being funded by tax dollars) fueled by discriminatory practices in arrest, conviction, sentencing, and parole, and in the end, financial exploitation. Multiple “private prison” companies, “non-profit” organizations and community corrections companies will rely on more convictions, parole and probation violations, alternative sentencing, and the like to tax, fine, fee, and charge poor people til death.

So-called “regional” jails will be built for private jail operators to receive even more tax payer funds.
Work release-style facilities will be created – where SB 67 authorizes up to 65% of gross earning to be deducted from the paychecks of already poor people – to go into the pockets of the “community corrections” companies that will charge to serve as collection agencies.

The kickbacks from these contracts will be in the form of campaign contribution to people like Senator Cam Ward.

The greatest benefit from SB 67 will continue to be the massive amounts of free labor that is being exploited from the men and women in Alabama prisons. These prison industries, funded by tax dollars, are generating billions of dollars in revenue. However, no one knows how large these industries are, or where all of the products or money from these industries are going.

For example, Alabama Correctional Industries runs a $25 million-dollar chemical plant at St. Clair prison. Where is that money going to? ADOC has a cattle ranch and a fish pond. Where is all beef and fish going? It certainly isn’t making its way to the kitchens in the prisons. Elmore runs the largest recycling plant in the State. Where are the proceeds?

And in spite of all of this free labor, no credit is deducted from the sentence. No deductions from the fines or court costs that a person may have. No deductions for child support that continues to accrue, even though the father or mother is working 8, 10, 12 hours days for free or pennies in wages.

In addition to this, a person who is forced to work for free every day also must pay a medical co-pay when they get sick. Where is this money supposed to come from? That is where the exploitation of our families comes in, because when they do send us money, the State deducts their “charges” first and we get what’s left.

SB 67 is nothing more than a continuation of these practices, only now the exploitation is moving away from the prisons and closer to the communities.

Three-part Plan of Action 2015

Establish a Headquarters at a prison or other place of mass incarceration in your city/county/state. Establish a protest cite at a MCDonald’s in your city/county/state.

Read our Plan Of Action 2015 article:

LET THE CROPS ROT IN THE FIELDS: A Call For A New Strategy in The National Movement Against Mass Incarceration and Prison Slavery – Short Version [Link: https://freealabamamovement.wordpress.com/2015/02/26/let-the-crops-rot-in-the-fields/ ]

By FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT

Join the National Movement Against Mass Incarceration and Prison Slavery today.

Free California Movement: Abolish the ‘legal’ slavery provision of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

From: NCTT-Cor-SHU:

The NCTT-COR-SHU is geared up to launch a grassroots campaign, in conjunction with other human rights activists on the inside and outside to abolish the ‘legal’ slavery provision of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which allows for the enslavement, involuntary servitude, and ‘civil death’ of prisoners, parolees and EVERYONE convicted of a crime in the U.S.

This provision is the civil basis for prisoners and ex-prisoner disenfranchisement, compulsory prison labor, ‘legal’ labor and housing discrimination for those segments of the population who most need fair access, disfavorable access to legal redress, a diminished standard of 1st Amendment and other essential constitutional protections, diminished access to educational, vocational, and higher learning opportunities, and most damaging to society as a whole – legitimizing the dehumanization of these citizens under the ‘law.’

The primary vehicle we will seek to employ this campaign nationally is the formation of the “Free California Movement,” in conjunction with prisoners across the state, while encouraging the formation and solidarity of other “Free… Movements” in every state in the Union. We recognize that each state’s prison system has its own unique contradictions (for example, in many southern states, prison labor is wholly uncompensated, while in California many prison jobs come with a pennies on the dollar slave wage, and other institutions have P.I.A. compensation for prison labor), but what is UNIVERSAL across the nation is all of the dehumanizing, discriminatory and inhumane statutes prisoners and former prisoners are subject to – be they prison regulations or penal codes- ALL flow from the ‘legal’ slavery provision of the 13th Amendment.

We will be reaching out to prisoners, activists, progressives, family members, friends and citizens from all walks of life in the coming months to support this vital effort which is key to positively resolving the malignant contradiction of rampant inequality and social alienation in American society. We hope we can count on your support looking forward.

Dec. 28, 2014

NCTT-Cor-SHU

CSP-Corcoran-SHU, CA 93212

freecaliforniamovement @ gmail.com

See also: Pattern of practice: Centuries of racist oppression culminating in mass incarceration, in: SF Bay View, Jan, 26th, 2015, by Mutope Duguma

Press Release: February 1 Protest To Highlight Inhumane Conditions In Alabama Prisons

Free Alabama Movement

*For Immediate Release*

January 26, 2015
Contact: Ann Brooks (256)783-1044

Press Release
February 1 Protest To Highlight Inhumane Conditions In Alabama Prisons

(Springville, Ala.) – Demanding an end to the filthy living conditions on Alabama’s death row and “a culture of violence” carried out by officials throughout the state’s maximum security prisons, families and friends of the men, women and children who are incarcerated in Alabama prisons will hold a peaceful protest on Sunday, Feb. 1.

Sponsored by the Free Alabama Movement (FAM), the protest will begin at 11:30 a.m.in front of the St. Clair Correctional Facility (SCCF), located at 1000 St. Clair Road in Springville.

FAM was started by men in Alabama state prisons to expose “the deplorable conditions and the slave labor inside the cement walls” of the state’s prisons. FAM has posted videos on You Tube in which over 80 men who are incarcerated in the Alabama Department of Corrections give their personal accounts about the inhumane living conditions they endure in Alabama prisons.

Three Alabama maximum security prisons, St. Clair CF, Holman Correctional Facility, and Donaldson Correctional Facility, all went on lockdown at some point in the past 10 days due to violent-related incidents.

Men and women are confined to their 8 by 12 foot cells 24 hours a day during lockdowns, and their family members
and friends cannot visit them.

On Jan. 25, several men on death row at Holman held a peaceful protest. Holman officials have denied these men use of equipment to clean their cells, and these men are being forced to eat cold sack lunches three times
a day. “We are human beings. Just because we’re on death row doesn’t mean that we have to live like animals,” said one death row inmate. The guards used pepper spray to punish the peaceful protesters in the segregation unit at Holman who were also protesting the inhumane living conditions.

SCCF has turned into one of the most dangerous prisons in America, according to the FAM. The prison’s warden, Carter Davenport was previously suspended in 2012 for assaulting a man confined at St. Clair in the head while he was handcuffed.

Riot police have been called in at SCCF, according to FAM. In the last two weeks, there have been at least 20 incidents in which people were stabbed or assaulted by an officer,  at SCCF. Prisoner Jarvis “Flame” Jenkins was beaten twice by guards and was seen with blood dripping from his clothes. Another SCCF prisoner, Derrick LaKeith Brown, has been hospitalized with injuries for a week.

Prison officials Warden Walter Myers and Captain Darryl Fails, and others, removed  James Pleasant from his cell at Holman on January 23, 2015, and told him that he, Robert E. Council (Holman) and Melvin Ray (St. Clair), known as the FAM 3, were problems to the ADOC and threatened to kill them for exposing inhumane and illegal conditions inside Alabama prisons.

FAM has been organizing Non-Violent and Peaceful Protests throughout the ADOC since January 1, 2015, when over a three week perios, over 4500 men participated in the demonstrated, which were supported by their families, friends, loved ones, and supporters nationwide.

For more information, call Ann Brooks at (256)783-1044.


UPDATED: On January 27, 2015, St. Clair CF went back on lockdown, where the overcrowding and lack of leadership from Warden Carter Davenport continues to cause a violent atmosphere.

REMEMBERING ROCRAST MACK: BEATEN TO DEATH BY ADOC OFFICERS

Remember Young Brother Rocrast Mack.

“STOP THE VIOLENCE, WARDEN DAVENPORT MUST GO”

“Another officer approached Mr. Mack and ordered him to get on the ground. Witnesses saw Mr. Mack comply with these orders and quickly get on his knees and place his hands on his head. Soon after, at least five other officers, including Lieutenant Michael Smith, arrived at the scene after responding to a call for back-up.

Even though Mr. Mack was on his knees and subdued, witnesses report that officers violently assaulted Mr. Mack. Officers beat Mr. Mack with batons and fists, striking his head, face, and body.

The correctional officer who initially got Mr. Mack to submit to arrest tried to intervene and attempted to pull the officers off of Mr. Mack and put himself between Mr. Mack and the assaulting officers. This officer was threatened by other guards and forced to retreat. Lieutenant Smith was heard to say that the guards were going to kill Mr. Mack.”

http://www.eji.org/rocrastmack

VIOLENCE CONTINUES ON AT ST. CLAIR PRISON IN SPRINGVILLE, ALABAMA

ANOTHER ASSAULT BY AN OFFICER AT ST. CLAIR PRISONS TODAY USING HADNCUFFS AS BRASSKNUCKLES TO ASSAULT AN UNARMED MAN

Part of the situation at St. Clair involves Officer Lindsey, who used a pair of handcuffs to hit a defenseless man in the mouth. The man defended himself in self-defense from this unprovoked attack, which left his mouth busted open and the officer with sever damage to his jaw and mouth.

This is the second incident in the past few months where an officer used a pair of handcuffs to assault someone. In the first incident, Ventura Harris was struck in the back of the head while handcuffed and required over 15 staples to close his scalp back together.

We are asking everyone to please join FAM on Sunday, Feb. 1, 2015, at 11:30 am for a “STOP THE VIOLENCE, WARDEN DAVENPORT MUST GO” Prayer Vigil and Demonstration.

Contact Ms. Ann “Mother Ray” Brooks @ 256-783-1044 for additional details.

WE GOT POWER!!! AN ECONOMIC SOLUTION TO MASS INCARCERATION.

FREE ALABAMA MOVEMENT
“WE GOT POWER”

We got Power y’all, and its the FREE labor and other money that we are providing to the ADOC.

Right now, the ADOC is getting appx. 2 to 3 billion dollars per year (IF NOT MORE !!) off of us from: work release, court costs and filing fees, production of license plates, cattle ranch, print shops, furniture plant, fleet services, chemical plant, fish pond, sand, recycling, farming, telephone calls, medical co-pays, canteen and much more.

We also work in the Montgomery warehouse, honor camps, kitchens, laundries, runners, libraries, dorm cleaners, and so much more, all for free.

WE PROVIDE THIS LABOR, AND THIS IS OUR POWER !!!

WE GOT POWER, and WE have to use, take it away from the ADOC, and make them change our living conditions, change parole, changes arbitrary sentencing, and allow us to earn our FREEDOM.

“WE GOT POWER”

BUSINESSMEN TALK DOLLARS, POLITICIANS TALK VOTES

BUSINESSMEN TALK DOLLARS, POLITICIANS TALK VOTES

When statesmen ruled the halls of politics, you could go to them and talk politically in terms effecting change based on how many votes you can bring in. Exchanges were made based on those numbers.

Nowadays, businessmen rule the halls of politics. Therefore, instead of talking number of votes, you have to be talking money. If you ain’t talking money, they ain’t listening.
Mass incarceration is now atleast a 500 billion dollar industry.

In Alabama, those numbers are somewhere between 2 and 3 billion dollars. That should give you an idea of the type of financial impact that your coalition must have in order to gain their attention. If we want to see changes in the system, we have to understand the business model that we are in.

And please remember that we are dealing with businessmen, not politicians. This is a very important distinction.

“STOP THE VIOLENCE, WARDEN DAVENPORT MUST GO”

“STOP THE VIOLENCE, WARDEN DAVENPORT MUST GO “

DavenportIn 2010, ADOC Commissioner Kim Thomas appointed Warden Carter Davenport as the Warden of St. Clair CF in Springville, Al. At the time Warden Davenport arrived, St. Clair was the least violent maximum security prison in the State of Alabama with only 23 incidents of violence for a prison population of appx. 1,300 men.

  • Just three (3) shorts years after his arrival to St. Clair in 2010, the violence level would quadrupled to 101 violent incidents in 2013, including two murders.

    By 2014, six people have been killed, including 4 murders in 2014 alone. St. Clair prison would witness historic levels of violence that would ultimately make St. Clair prison one of the worst in the Nation.

    Warden Davenport has created a toxic and hopeless environment where violence rules and where there is no accountability, no respect for Adm. Regs and S.O.P.’s, and no resources allocated to Education and Rehabilitation.

    Warden Davenport has overseen an administration that has repeatedly violated the Civil and Human Rights of the men incarcerated under his authority at St. Clair. In fact, Warden Davenport himself has been suspended for beating a man in handcuffs at St. Clair in 2012.

    The Equal Justice Initiative and the Southern Povery Law Center have filed class action lawsuits against Warden Davenport and ADOC for the violent culture and abuse that Davenport has overseen. One man, Joseph Shack was awarded over $70,000 in 2014 when he was beaten while handcuffed by Sgt. Mason- Sgt. Mason remains employed. EJI, The Montgomery Advertisor, and several others have called for Warden Davenport’s removal.

    As Under Davenport’s watch, six (6) people have been killed at St. Clair prison: Jamie Bell, John Rutledge, Marquette Cummings, Tim Duncan, Jodie Waldrop and Jabari Bascomb.

    2015 began with a wave of violence that has taken St. Clair by storm. As of January 23rd, over 20 people have been stabbed, officers have beaten several people, the Riot Team was called in, the prison went on lockdown, and several men are still hospitalized.

    Prior to Warden Davenport’s arrival at St. Clair prison, the men incarcerated, in conjunction with the previous Wardens David Wise and Warden DeAngelo Burrell, had founded a program called Convicts Against Violence. This program was largely responsible for bringing down the violence level at St. Clair to the historic lows that were in place when Davenport arrived. Yet, since his arrival at St. Clair, Warden Davenport stopped the Convicts Against Violence program, and to this day, C.A.V. remains the only program that has been stopped.

    Warden Davenport also ended C.A.V.’s conflict resolution and mediation classes, and the Educational and Mentoring program which had enrolled and actively engaged over 400 Students from L-M and P-Q dorms where predominately black men were/are now “warehoused” with no oulets for their frustration.

    This abuse of power and state-engineered violence, which can be tracked back directly to the hiring of Warden Carter Davenport must be stopped. Some guards at St Clair are undisciplined and abusive under the leadership of Warden Davenport. This is not the way citizens of the State of Alabama intend for their tax dollars to be spent. Take control of your tax money and sign this Petition to have Warden Carter Davenport removed from our payroll.