Alabama Department of Corrections feeling threatened by mere “uneducated”black men?

October 11,2016

The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding thefree exercise of religion, abridging thefreedom of speech, infringing on thefreedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble, or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights.

The Bill of Rights was originally proposed to assuage Anti-Federalistopposition to Constitutional ratification. Initially, the First Amendment applied only to laws enacted by the Congress, and many of its provisions were interpreted more narrowly than they are today. Beginning with Gitlow v. New York(1925), the Supreme Court applied the First Amendment to states—a process known as incorporation—through theDue Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

In Everson v. Board of Education (1947), the Court drew on Thomas Jefferson‘s correspondence to call for “a wall of separation between church and State”, though the precise boundary of this separation remains in dispute. Speech rights were expanded significantly in a series of 20th and 21st-century court decisions which protected various forms of political speech, anonymous speech, campaign financing,pornography, and school speech; these rulings also defined a series ofexceptions to First Amendment protections. The Supreme Court overturned English common lawprecedent to increase the burden of proof for defamation and libel suits, most notably in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (1964). Commercial speech, however, is less protected by the First Amendment than political speech, and is therefore subject to greater regulation.

The Free Press Clause protects publication of information and opinions, and applies to a wide variety of media. In Near v. Minnesota (1931) and New York Times v. United States (1971), the Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment protected against prior restraint—pre-publication censorship—in almost all cases. The Petition Clause protects the right to petition all branches and agencies of government for action. In addition to the right of assembly guaranteed by this clause, the Court has also ruled that the amendment implicitly protects freedom of association.

   With that said it’s been reported today that the founders of The Free Alabama Movement have once again become targets by the Department of Corrections by way of harassment, threats of violence, and destruction of property.

  It was reported that officers are repeatedly visiting Robert Earl Council, and Melvin Ray entering there cells under the guise of routine shake downs, in the process administering threats of violence, and destroying their property including but not limited to personal items, and legal work.

WHY? Is the question. To answer that in simple form, the State is threatened of there long time monopoly by what these men are exposing. Thus they retaliate.

The state says they welcome the Department of Justice but their actions show otherwise. If they did why would they infringe on these men’s 1st amendment rights of the United States Constitution?

 It’s been common practice in history that organized crime families will silence witnesses against them. The State of Alabama at this time is nothing less than an organized crime group that should be prosecuted under the Rico Act.

 Please continue to support these men and contact the Department of Justice and voice your concern about the Department of Corrections harming these men further.

         Unheard voices

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2 thoughts on “Alabama Department of Corrections feeling threatened by mere “uneducated”black men?

  1. I want to become a part of your efforts. I believe in this movement. I have recently met (via internet chat) an inmate in Holman. How can become part of your fight??

    Liked by 1 person

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